Thanks!

After an awesome year of training and travel with RMR, I’ve recently made the decision to stop skiing competitively at this level. It was amazing to live the ‘full time athlete life’ for the year, and I feel like I’ve learned so much from the experience. To be honest, if someone told me a year ago that I could race in Europe, train all year, make top tens in NORAMS and feel this fit, I would have laughed long and hard. Now that the year is over, it feels very surreal. I’m happy 🙂

I’m also excited for what’s coming up. I’m aiming for work outside this summer, and after that I’d love to get into a Park’s job and see more of Canada. I’ll never be “done” with skiing or racing. Although it’s super clichéd, it’s true that I’m ready for skiing to take a different place in my life, and to do and see different things.

There’s many people I need to thank for this year and for the years before:

–      My friends, who put up with my 10pm bedtimes and ran and skied with me all through school, who let me complain and commiserated about training, school, and general life.

–      The Coaches (all of them, from high school to Augustana until now), who somehow helped me to contort my noodle self into a functional and powerful technique in skate and classic (something that still boggles ma mind!), and taught me about sport and life in a hundred different ways.

–      My new friends and sponsors in Canmore, and the community here that made me feel really welcome.

–    My family and close friends, who supported and cared about me even when I appeared feckless or confused, who cheered at all my races (even when I was in the penalty loop), and encouraged me to be strong and have fun from the first race until now.

Thank you! I owe you all so much 🙂

 

If ski racing is a bus, I’m pulling that little rope thing and getting off at a stop, lugging my giant ski bag and backpack out the door, with a big smile on my face. It’s been a sweet ride.

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Year Recap: RMR

Something you’ve probably got from a year of blogging: RMR is a super team! The coaching is great, the training locations are great, and my fellow teammates made training and living in Canmore absolutely fantastic.

Some training, racing, life memories with RMR that will stick with me for a looonggg time.

  1. The big blue open bowl of Sunshine, and skiing in May, on snow. In May. Realizing how far my technique had to go before Coach JJ would stop raising his eyebrows and going, “Hmmmmmm.”IMG_2115 IMG_2224
  2. Backpacking the beautiful West Coast Trail with the team, playing Frisbee with ocean trash, laughing over campfires and mud pits, and how good that Coke tasted afterwards.007_6A
  3. Hiking higher than I have ever hiked before to climb Mt. Temple. This hike also included a nap break, which was funny.IMG_2453
  4. The chaos of the Boat Race at the Haig. Followed by winning the Boat Race at the Haig. It made me realize how crazy and competitive these people were, and how great it was. The Haig camps in general, from singing and dancing competitions, to num nums, to crevases, to losing GN, to sprint starts in the sun. I think the Haig might actually be summer ski heaven, but with the disturbing presence of store-burn toilets.IMG_2535 IMG_2612 IMG_2641 IMG_2788 IMG_2807
  5. SSS and pulling people up hills. “You want me to do what?!”IMG_2665
  6. Park City camp! Feeling like a boss while rollerskiing in front of the team van. Time trialing at SoHo, eating too many tacos, lactate tests, and eating giant donuts mid ski.IMG_3219 IMG_3239 IMG_3359
  7. Racing and freezing our bums off at the early B.C. NORAMS. woW. Then racing at Olympic trials. OLYMPIC TRIALS?! What is this life?IMG_3794 IMG_3962
  8. The RMR Not-So-Germany Tour. Flat out great. Plus Newfoundland and Nationals.IMG_4894IMG_4285IMG_4320 IMG_4499
  9. Shark Fest home races. So many v-boards and radios and clipboards, and so much fun.IMG_4944 IMG_4954
  10. Everyone pictured (and not pictured) here. Thanks for a great year!qdcj9g6BCHYZy_OJHbiQbAJzyMOk9EsdJDIqyeiSUwU

“At its worst, ski racing is cerebral and introverted. You think. You think about the time you’re losing to your competitors, your pain, and your miserable, sorry-ass little, hurting self. That doesn’t mean the best ski racing is totally mindless. Throughout the early part of the race you monitor your intensity, are respectful of the distance, gauge how you will go fastest for the duration… Even this becomes automatic and is conditioned into you by years of training and racing. Then, at some point in the race you are able to let go of even that and just GO. Ski racing, at its best is not really a brains kind of operation; it’s more a vicious JOY.”

 

Pete Vordenburg

From Momentum: Chasing the Olympic Dream, 2002